Pituitary Tumor Symptoms Vary Related To Certain Factors

Pituitary tumour symptoms emerge when there is a development of atypical cells in the pituitary glands’ tissues. The pituitary gland is the very small organ found at the central portion of the brain slightly over the back of the nose. Pituitary tumours may develop in the pituitary gland.

Classifications of pituitary tumours

Pituitary tumours are classified into three groupings. The first group is comprised of benign pituitary adenomas or non-cancerous tumours. These growths develop exceedingly in a progressive manner and do not extend from the pituitary gland to other parts of the body. The second classification of these tumours is invasive pituitary adenomas. These are still benign tumours that have the possibility to proliferate to the extent of reaching the bones of the skull or probably the sinus cavity that is located underneath the pituitary gland. The third classification is pituitary carcinomas. These are malignant or cancerous tumours that may possibly extend to other parts of the central nervous system which include the brain and the spinal cord. From here, these tumours may also reach the parts beyond the CNS. However, not too many pituitary tumours become cancerous.     

Some pituitary tumours are non-functioning while others are functioning. Non-functioning pituitary tumours do not generate hormones while the functioning ones generate over the usual quantity of hormones. Majority of pituitary tumours are functioning. When these tumours generate surplus hormones, this may engender some signs or symptoms of certain illness.  

Pituitary tumour symptoms

Symptoms may differ for individuals who are found to have pituitary tumour. This is contingent to certain factors like the type of tumour the individual has; the extent of the size of the developed tumour; the location of the tumour; and if it makes hormones or does not make any. The pituitary tumour symptoms can vary from simple complaints or usual condition like malaise or being tired and restless into more severe symptoms like headaches, nausea and vomiting, or light-headedness. For certain circumstances which involve the most prevalent type of pituitary tumour, the symptoms that can be observed from that individual may consist of menstruation problems, eyesight problems, headaches, and loss of sexual drive. Other tumour symptoms may include high blood pressure levels, either loss of weight or weight gain, as well as immoderate consumption of food. Other general signs and symptoms are confusion, dizziness, seizures, a runny nose wherein the liquid that leaks out from the nose could be the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) that envelops the brain and spinal cord. If adjoining parts of the brain are also affected by the presence of a pituitary tumour there can be more pituitary tumour symptoms that can emerge as soon as the growth develops into a large tumour and puts pressure on the adjacent parts of the brain. For example, pituitary tumours can put pressure on the optic nerve which consequently will cause problems on the person’s ability to see. It is recommended to consult a physician for any indication of probable symptoms of a pituitary tumour which include headaches, eyesight problems, nausea and vomiting, and dizziness.

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