The Most Common Dry Cough Causes

The human body, one is not tired of saying, is a wonderful machine. With silent efficiency it takes its wakeful post as a tireless watchman, looking after your welfare, leaving all avenues of communication open, employing all modes of contact with your body’s distant parts and allowing you to go about your business when everything runs smoothly. However, at the first sign of trouble, –any and all kinds of trouble, and there are lots – it lets go with an amazing arsenal of warning signals to inform you, first that something is not going right, second, points to where the trouble is and then directs you to take the necessary steps to save your skin while he delivers the first defensive blows or makes the initial vital repairs.  There are clear indications for dry cough causes, but are you listening?

 

Take chronic dry coughs for instance. Dry cough causes are relatively simple matters to trace. Backtracking a little, the body’s primary warning signal that something is wrong is pain. Depending on the nature of the stimuli, the body’s pain signals will tell you instantly where the intruder is, and informs you about the seriousness of the intrusion. On this basis, the mind—that is, you—react, first reflexively away from danger which saves you precious seconds, and then defensively, this time involving your conscious self, enabling you to make a decision: flee or fight. The beauty about the pain warning is that it usually is quite precise. It has a set of trauma warnings that you can readily decipher, and thus recognize what happened generally so you can react properly. So you know when it is a scratch pain (Ignorable), a bump pain (ouch! and move away), a blow pain or a wound pain, very serious intrusions delivering very clear signals for you to do something fast because your survival mechanism is kicking in and you ignore it at your peril. But a dry cough? Why is it an issue identifying dry cough causes?

 

Slightly lower than pain in the warning signal hierarchy is the cough. Like pain, it is an autonomic, reflexive mechanism that is triggered by a variety of stimuli, but unlike pain, a cough can be managed consciously by the person who owns the property – it’s your own throat after all. And here is where the problem starts. A reflexive cough, as said, is a signal but only because you have already been made aware that the respiratory system has been compromised—by infection or by foreign body intrusion. You cough when you suffer any of various lung infections, but you also cough when, say, a piece of sour candy didn’t go down well and threatened to enter the larynx rather than the esophagus. So that the cough is the body’s pitching arm, hurling—or attempting to hurl—obstructions out of the upper respiratory passages, the harder the cough, the greater the force expended to get rid of the foreign matter, basically phlegm, which classifies it as a wet cough, or a normal cough, if the suffering could be called normal. Dry cough causes actually are easily pinned down.

 

A dry cough has its own agenda, and you ignore it at potentially huge cost. The difficulty is that the dry cough is indeed more of a signaler than a pitcher—it hurls nothing out no matter the magnitude of the force involved. It signals that there is foreign matter in your upper breathing apparatus, but a sort of matter that it cannot readily expel – smoke residue, dust, incipient bacterial or viral infections that have not grown large enough to be recognized but no less a peril to your health.  Dry coughs causes generally consist of the insidiously dangerous foreign matter in there, and once the causes are known and the danger is recognized, the dry cough is saying it cannot do it alone. It’s telling you there is an enemy in there and you do the digging out. It’s very serious stuff.   

 

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